The Potential of GMail

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"As the flashbulbs burst, she holds a smile like someone would hold a crying child."
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Posted on April 24, 2004 2:20 PM in Computers
Warning: This blog entry was written two or more years ago. Therefore, it may contain broken links, out-dated or misleading content, or information that is just plain wrong. Please read on with caution.

One of, if not the, hottest topics in the world of technology these days is Google's GMail.

GMail has immense potential to change the way we think of and use email. Why do I say this? Think of the Web about four or five years ago. Back then, people often referred to using search engines like Yahoo! and AltaVista as, simply enough, "searching the Web." Nowadays, people call it "Googling."

Now think about that. That is a huge deal. Imagine if we referred to drinking pop as "Coking" or watching television as "Sonying." Because Google was able to redefine how we search the Web, they left their competitors in the dust and became the de facto standard for finding information on the World Wide Web.

Fast forward to 2004 and we see GMail on the horizon. The service promises storage space vastly superior to its competitors (e.g. Hotmail and Yahoo! Mail), easy and highly advanced email searching capabilities, as well as the portability that any Web-based email service provides. On top of that, it comes with the name-brand recognition and feeling of trust that the Google Web-searching service provides. The only question that remains is, who or what can even dream of stopping GMail?

I believe that three or four years from now the word "GMail" will be to "email" what the word "Googling" is to "searching the Web." You will no longer hear people talking about email; you will simply hear things like "I GMailed you earlier, did you get that?"

With promises of syndication and APIs, it is very resonable to think that blogging and "GMailing" will go hand-in-hand and that third parties will be writing applications that handle GMail functionality (e.g. POP3 and RSS). Such applications could, potentially speaking, eventually overtake applications like Microsoft Exchange that are too tied to one mode of use (whether it be a particular operating system, etc.).

It will be interesting to look back on these thoughts in a few years and see what has come of Google's promising new service. I know that when the flood gates open for registering a GMail account, I'll be one of the first to dive in.

Comments

nihar on May 28, 2004 at 9:15 PM:

how can i register for gmail

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labinot on June 24, 2005 at 6:31 AM:

I`ts cool e-mail

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