Firefox Secrets

Album Cover: Begin To Hope

"On the radio, you hear November Rain. That solo's awful long, but it's a good refrain."
Regina Spektor / On The Radio

Posted on July 04, 2005 9:26 PM in Browsers
Warning: This blog entry was written two or more years ago. Therefore, it may contain broken links, out-dated or misleading content, or information that is just plain wrong. Please read on with caution.

Earlier this week I received my free copy of the book Firefox Secrets in exchange for letting SitePoint include my Firefox port of the GrayModern theme on a CD they included with the book (as previously blogged).

I spent some time last night skimming through some of the chapters and I have to give props to Chu Yeow for putting together an excellent Firefox resource for novices and power users alike.

I was a little disappointed that neither I nor, more importantly, Johannes Schellen, were given credit for any of the work that went into creating the GrayModern theme for Firefox, but such is life:

This is – you guessed it – a gray, modern theme that, like Whitehart, is a continuation of work that was started and discontinued by its original creator. The Gray Modern [sic] theme was first seen in the Mozilla Application Suite and was created by Joe Hewitt. If you're migrating from that earlier browser to Firefox, this theme...can give you and your users some continuity as they make the transition.

Nevertheless, Firefox Secrets is a goldmine of information that I highly recommend to anyone that is interested in learning more about what Firefox can do for them.

Comments

nordsieck on July 05, 2005 at 2:01 PM:

Just curious:
does the book have any stuff in it for developers, or is it mostly about using firefox?

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Bernie Zimmermann on July 05, 2005 at 6:59 PM:

Good question, nordsieck. Chapter 7 is titled "Web Development Nirvana" and goes into pretty decent detail about Greasemonkey scripts, mastering the DOM Inspector, Venkman (the JavaScript debugger), etc. If you're speaking more along the lines of actual code or app development, though, then the book probably isn't for you.

Call me crazy, but I feel like as soon as a technology book comes out, it's practically out-of-date already. If I wanted to get into Firefox hacking, I'd turn to online resources long before I'd start looking through already-published books. But that's just me.

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